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Twinkle, twinkle little stars

Twinkle, twinkle little stars

A man puts a circle around a star lantern. The job is finished when a handle is attached to it.

A girl arranges the star bamboo frames. Each lantern has two star frames stuck together. Small sticks are put between the frames to make the lantern swell up, and then cellophane paper is glued on.

Girls work behind a finished product. The lanterns are sold for between VND3,000 and VND5,000 apiece, depending on their sizes, as the village targets poor children whose parents cannot afford Chinese electric lanterns of VND70,000 each.

The lanterns are given yellow strips as one of the last stages. There are piles of lanterns waiting for the girls to work on.

An old woman patches the handles for the lanterns.

A girl helps her mother decorate a thin stick that will eventually circle the stars.

Boys sit by a pile of bamboo frames that will be used to make the star lanterns.

A boy places the yellow strips on the lanterns. Locals say making lanterns are a turnover business. The more you sell, the better. Hence a lot of hard work is involved and families deploy as many people as they can, with children helping out with the smaller, easier tasks.

A woman puts out pieces of yellow-colored paper to dry. The paper is later cut into strips to line the stars, above the cellophane paper.

A man puts a circle around a star lantern. The job is finished when a handle is attached to it.
A girl arranges the star bamboo frames. Each lantern has two star frames stuck together. Small sticks are put between the frames to make the lantern swell up, and then cellophane paper is glued on.
Girls work behind a finished product. The lanterns are sold for between VND3,000 and VND5,000 apiece, depending on their sizes, as the village targets poor children whose parents cannot afford Chinese electric lanterns of VND70,000 each.
The lanterns are given yellow strips as one of the last stages. There are piles of lanterns waiting for the girls to work on.
An old woman patches the handles for the lanterns.
A girl helps her mother decorate a thin stick that will eventually circle the stars.
Boys sit by a pile of bamboo frames that will be used to make the star lanterns.
A boy places the yellow strips on the lanterns. Locals say making lanterns are a turnover business. The more you sell, the better. Hence a lot of hard work is involved and families deploy as many people as they can, with children helping out with the smaller, easier tasks.
A woman puts out pieces of yellow-colored paper to dry. The paper is later cut into strips to line the stars, above the cellophane paper.