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Terraced fields - a man-made wonder
By VNA -
The terraced field in Nam Ty commune is among the most beautiful in Hoang Su Phi district, Ha Giang province. Photo credit: Vietnam News Agency/Bao Anh Viet Nam
Ta Van valley in Sa Pa town attracts visitors thanks to its primitive natural landscapes and mesmerizing terraced fields embracing villages. 
Terraced rice fields that look like trays of steamed sticky rice or shoe soles during ripe season in Che Cu Nha commune, Mu Cang Chai disitrct.
Terraced rice fields during the harvest in Ban Luoc commune, Hoang Su Phi district, Ha Giang province.
During the harvest, terraced fields in Che Cu Nha commune (Mu Cang Chai district, Yen Bai province) form rolling waves rising to the peak of the mountain.
Mong ethnic women in Mu Cang Chai district form the field banks to prepare for a new crop.
Mong, Dao, Tay, Nung, La Chi ethnic people make water pipes from bamboo poles to divert water from streams to fields or from higher fields to lower ones.
Mong people in Mu Cang Chai district often start transplanting rice seedlings in May or June.
Ho Thi De in De Thang hamlet, Che Cu Nha commune (Mu Cang Chai) says that harvested rice
will be sun-dried in the field for three days before being threshed to remove the stalks and delivered to houses.
After harvesting rice, Nung people in Po Lo commune (Hoang Su Phi,  Ha Giang) use mangers to thresh rice in the field.
Nowadays, the Nung people in Po Lo commune (Hoang Su Phi) still keep the custom of exchanging labour during the harvest season.
Baskets full of golden rice represent the wealth of ethnic people in the Northwest. 
The Red Dao people in Ho Thau commune (Hoang Su Phi) pray for the Deity of Rice.
A sorcerer conducts the ritual to call the spirit of rice.
Sorcerer Trieu Choi Hin in Ho Thau commune (Hoang Su Phi) blows a horn to call the spirit of rice.
The Red Dao people in Hoang Su Phi district believe that the spirit of each grain of rice can call 1,000 grains to their baskets, resulting in measureless rice for people.
During Tet holiday, the Mong people often stick colorful paper to farming tools to express their thanks.