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The Zika babies
By Reuters -
Gleyse Kelly holds her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been overwhelmed by the alarming surge in cases of babies born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder associated with the mosquito-borne virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. In studies of the current outbreak in Brazil, genetic material from the Zika virus has been identified in studies of brain tissue, placenta and amniotic fluid from several infants with microcephaly and from miscarried fetuses from women infected with the virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. Brazil's Health Ministry said in November that Zika was linked to a fetal deformation known as microcephaly, in which infants are born with smaller-than-usual brains. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Child neurologist Vanessa Van Der Linden observes the X-ray of a baby's skull with microcephaly at the hospital Barao de Lucena in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. Brazil has reported 3,893 suspected cases of microcephaly, the WHO said last Friday, over 30 times more than in any year since 2010 and equivalent to 1-2 percent of all newborns in the state of Pernambuco, one of the worst-hit areas. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Gleyce Kelly embraces her daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
A nurse of the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital prepares to draw blood from baby who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Pregnant women wait for a routine general checkup, which includes a test for mosquito-borne viruses like Zika, at the maternity ward of the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera 
Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, son of Jaqueline Maria and Geovane Silva, undergoes medical treatment at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Camile Vitoria embraces her brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Veridiana Silva (R) waits for medical care for her daughter Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino 
Hospital staff Oswaldo Cruz prepares to draw blood from baby Lorrany Emily da Silva, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino