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Einstein's gravitational waves
By Reuters -
The collision of two black holes holes - a tremendously powerful event detected for the first time ever by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO - is seen in this still image from a computer simulation released in Washington February 11, 2016. Scientists have for the first time detected gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by Albert Einstein a century ago, in a landmark discovery announced on Thursday that opens a new window for studying the cosmos. REUTERS/Caltech/MIT/LIGO Laboratory/Handout via Reuters 
Dr. David Reitze, Executive Director of the LIGO Laboratory at Caltech, speaks about gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in Washington February 11, 2016. The waves were detected by twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave detectors (LIGO) in Louisiana and Washington states in September 2015. REUTERS/Gary Cameron 
Roni Grosz, curator of the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive, points at original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves during a news conference in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun   
An artist's rendering of an outburst on an ultra-magnetic neutron star, also called a magnetar is shown in this handout provided by NASA February 10, 2016. A century ago, physicist Albert Einstein proposed the existence of gravitational waves, small ripples in the space-time continuum that dash across the universe at the speed of light. REUTERS/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Handout via Reuters 
Dr. Kip Thorne of Caltech listens during a news conference to discuss the detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in Washington February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron 
Roni Grosz, curator of the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive, displays original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves during a news conference in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Roni Grosz, curator of the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive, points to original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves during a news conference in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
An artist's illustration shows a supermassive black hole with millions to billions times the mass of our sun at the center, surrounded by matter flowing onto the black hole in what is termed an accretion disk in this NASA illustration released on February 27, 2013. Supermassive black holes are enormously dense objects buried at the hearts of galaxies. This disk forms as the dust and gas in the galaxy falls onto the hole, attracted by its gravity. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Handout 
Dr. David Reitze, Executive Director of the LIGO Laboratory at Caltech, shows the merging of two black holes at a news conference to discuss the detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in Washington February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron  
An exhibit is seen at the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive during a news conference where original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves were displayed in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Roni Grosz, curator of the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive, displays original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves during a news conference in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun 
Dr. Rainer Weiss, emeritus professor of physics at MIT, uses a visual aide during a news conference to discuss the detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time hypothesized by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago, in Washington February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron 
Markarian 231, a binary black hole found in the center of the nearest quasar host galaxy to Earth, is seen in a NASA illustration released August 27, 2015. Like a pair of whirling skaters, the black-hole duo generates tremendous amounts of energy that makes the core of the host galaxy outshine the glow of the galaxy's population of billions of stars, according to a NASA news release. REUTERS/NASA/Handout 
Roni Grosz, curator of the Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archive, displays original documents related to Albert Einstein's hypothesis of the existence of gravitational waves during a news conference in Jerusalem February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun