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2015 Nobel Prize winners
By Reuters -
British-born economist Angus Deaton of Princeton University signs a book after winning the 2015 economics Nobel Prize on the Princeton University campus in Princeton, New Jersey October 12, 2015. Deaton has won the 2015 economics Nobel Prize for his work on consumption, poverty and welfare that has helped governments to improve policy through tools such as household surveys and tax changes. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the microeconomist's work had been a major influence on policy making, helping for example to determine how different social groups are affected by specific changes in taxation. REUTERS/Dominick Reuter 
Belarussian author Svetlana Alexievich holds flowers as she arrives to attend a news conference in Minsk, Belarus, October 8, 2015. Alexievich won the Nobel Prize for Literature for her portrayal of life in the former Soviet Union which the Swedish Academy said was "a monument to suffering and courage in our time." REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko 
Hussein Abassi, head of the Tunisian General Labor Union (UGTT), one of the winners of the Nobel Peace prize for mediating a peaceful transition in that country's Arab Spring, talks during an interview with Reuters TV in Sao Paulo, Brazil, October 10, 2015. Nobel Peace Prize winner Abassi of the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet condemned the twin bomb attacks which blasted the Turkish capital on Saturday, one day after he was awarded the prize. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
Wided Bouchamaoui, president of Tunisia's Employers' Organization (UTICA) and a member of Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet, talks to journalists in her office in Tunis, Tunisia October 9, 2015. Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet won the Nobel Peace Prize for helping build democracy in the birthplace of the Arab Spring, an example of peaceful transition in a region otherwise struggling with violence and upheaval. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi 
Tomas Lindahl poses for photographers after winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry at the Francis Crick Institute Clare Hall Laboratory, just north of London, Britain, October 7, 2015. Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar won the prize for "mechanistic studies of DNA repair." Their work mapped how cells repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to prevent damaging errors from appearing in genetic information. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
Satoshi Omura, special honor professor of Kitasato University, reacts as he attends a news conference in Tokyo October 5, 2015. Irish-born William Campbell and Japan's Omura won half of the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering avermectin, a derivative of which has been used to treat hundreds of millions of people with river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, or elephantiasis. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
Takaaki Kajita (R), director of the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, receives flowers from his university during a news conference in Tokyo October 6, 2015. Kajita and Canadian scientist Arthur McDonald won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Physics for discovering that elusive subatomic particles called neutrinos have mass, opening a new window onto the fundamental nature of the universe. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
Takaaki Kajita, director of the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, gestures during a news conference in Tokyo October 6, 2015. Kajita and Canadian scientist Arthur McDonald won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Physics for discovering that elusive subatomic particles called neutrinos have mass, opening a new window onto the fundamental nature of the universe. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
William C. Campbell, a parasitologist and RISE Associate with Drew University, poses near paintings he made of parasites shortly after learning that he was a co-winner of the Nobel Prize for medicine, at his home in North Andover, Massachusetts October 5, 2015. Irish-born William Campbell and Japan's Satoshi Omura won half of the prize for discovering avermectin, a derivative of which has been used to treat hundreds of millions of people with river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, or elephantiasis. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
Arthur B. McDonald, professor Emeritus at Queen's University in Canada, speaks on the phone at Queen's University, he was a co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics at his home in Kingston, Ontario October 6, 2015. Japan's Takaaki Kajita and Canada's Arthur B. McDonald won the 2015 Nobel Prize for Physics for their discovery that neutrinos, labeled nature's most elusive particles, have mass, the award-giving body said. REUTERS/Lars Hagberg 
Satoshi Omura, special honor professor of Kitasato University, receives a phone call from Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during a news conference in Tokyo October 5, 2015. Irish-born William Campbell and Japan's Satoshi Omura won half of the prize for discovering avermectin, a derivative of which has been used to treat hundreds of millions of people with river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, or elephantiasis. REUTERS/Issei Kato 
William C. Campbell, a parasitologist and RISE Associate with Drew University, views a collection of microscopes shortly after learning that he was a co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Medicine, at his home in North Andover, Massachusetts October 5, 2015. Irish-born William Campbell and Japan's Satoshi Omura won half of the prize for discovering avermectin, a derivative of which has been used to treat hundreds of millions of people with river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, or elephantiasis. REUTERS/Brian Snyder 
Tu Youyou, one of the three awardees for the 2015 Nobel Prize for Medicine, gestures during a meeting at her home, in Beijing, October 6, 2015. China's Tu Youyou was awarded half of the prize for discovering artemisinin, a drug that has slashed malaria deaths and has become the mainstay of fighting the mosquito-borne disease. She is China's first Nobel laureate in medicine. REUTERS/Stringer